Alison Brough

“Initially I enrolled to study a BSc in Biomedical Sciences but during my first year I looked into transferring to study forensic anthropology. Before I came to Dundee I wasn’t familiar with this discipline but after researching the curriculum, I quickly discovered that forensic anthropology is an interesting and complex subject that is well suited to my interests."

I chose to study at the University of Dundee for a number of reasons. I knew that Dundee was renowned for scientific research, associated with the Wellcome Trust Centre, and that the University had an excellent reputation for undergraduate science degrees. I was also impressed by the wide range of student societies and extracurricular activities that were offered.

“Initially I enrolled to study a BSc in Biomedical Sciences but during my first year I looked into transferring to study forensic anthropology. Before I came to Dundee I wasn’t familiar with this discipline but after researching the curriculum, I quickly discovered that forensic anthropology is an interesting and complex subject that is well suited to my interests.

“After taking part in an interview, I was thrilled to find out that my application to transfer had been accepted. In June 2009, I graduated from the University of Dundee with a First Class Honours degree in Forensic Anthropology. Shortly after, I applied for a research PhD studentship at the University of Leicester, which I began later that year.

“The focus of my research was 'Computed tomography assessment of bone and teeth of the developing child' and was undertaken under the supervision of Professor Bruno Morgan, Consultant Radiologist and Professor Guy Rutty, Home Office registered Forensic Pathologist.

“The project was designed to assess a) the use of computed tomography, versus traditional radiological, anthropological and odontological techniques, for the identification of the developing human skeleton and b) the application and limitations of computed tomography for investigating childhood skeletal trauma related to non-accidental injury and child death in the context of mass fatality incidents.

“During my PhD I prepared and delivered numerous presentations to large professional conferences both in the UK and internationally including; annual BAHID meeting 2011 and 2012 in Manchester; AAFS 64th annual scientific meeting, 2012 in Atlanta, USA; 2nd Congress of the International Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging (ISFRI), 2013 in Zurich, Switzerland; Forensic Science Society-Forensic Horizon Conference, 2013 in Manchester.

“Currently, I am working as a research associate within the East midlands Forensic Pathology Unit, which will hopefully be extended to a permanent post-doctorate position, when I officially attain my doctorate degree.”